Egypt Diary 5

Chapter Five

Day Six.

After a good Egyptian Kebab lunch we headed straight to the Aswan Railway Station to catch our train to Luxor. The train and platforms were much cleaner than I thought they will be. The seats in the train were comfortable and our ride to Luxor took three hours. While on the train, we also got an opportunity to see a bit of Egypt countryside, which was quite greener. We reached Luxor in the evening. The Luxor station was more crowded than Aswan.

Platform, Aswan Railway Station.
Our train to Luxor on platform, Aswan Railway Station.
Inside the train.

From there we went straight to our Hotel. The Hotel, Emilio in Luxor was in the middle of the market overlooking the Nile. The views were very good but our stay was average.

View of Nile from our room in Emilio.
A Hot air balloon takes off in Luxor.

Our first stop the day after, was The Valley of the Kings, on the west bank of the Nile. It was a long drive from our Hotel but totally worth it. At present in the valley, there are about 63 tombs dating back 500 years from 16th to 11th century BC. All these are royal tombs cut into the rock for Pharaohs and other powerful nobles. Among them is also the famous tomb of Tutankhamen.

Sphinx in the Temple of Hatshepsut..
Temple of Hatshepsut.
Paintings inside the temple.
Paintings inside the temple.
Temple of Hathor.
Temple of Hatshepsut.

Most of these tombs have been plundered and looted of the riches, but they still gives a fair idea of their opulence. The floods, the toxics in the air and even mass tourism have taken a toll on them. So now only a few tombs are open to tourists. Yet the Tutankhamen tomb remains most famous archaeological sites in the world. It is part of the World Heritage site.

To avoid further damage dehumidifiers have also been installed inside and the tombs are opened on a rotation basis to tourists. To protect the paintings on the rocks photography is not allowed inside the tombs.

The tomb of Ramesses II.

It is a complex tomb about 125 meters long, from the entrance there is stairway leading to the 1st corridor with small annex on either side.  This then leads to a second corridor leading to a dead-end room. This is because by miscalculations they hit another tomb and abandoned the work. Later Ramesses III continued with the 3rd corridor, though access to it for tourists was blocked and we were not allowed to go further.

Tomb of Tutankhamen.

Most of the things that were found here have been moved into the museums.

Next on our tour was the Temple of Hatshepsut.

This temple lies beneath the Deir el Bahari cliff and is a very beautiful structure. There were terraces, gardens of frankincense trees and other rare plantations. It was built by Queen Hatshepsut and there were a number of her portraits on the rocks which were later destroyed on royal orders after her death. In the surviving portraits, she appears as a male pharaoh with royal headdress and kilt and sometimes with a false beard.

There is a ramp leading to the courtyard and from there is another ramp leading to the terraces, where off course access to tourists is not allowed.

Our next stop was the Temple of Karnack. It is huge complex which was built over 2000 years and has many temples dedicated to God Amun Ra. Although most of it is in ruins it can still give a run for their money to many modern-day structures. Their size and grandeur is unmatched even today. You just keep wondering, how did they do it in those days thousand of years ago.

Karnack temple.
Karnack temple.
Karnack temple.
Karnack temple.
Karnack temple.
Karnack temple.

It is the largest religious place ever built and had been a place of pilgrimage for almost 2000 years. It is spread in 61 acres and is virtually impossible to see it in one day. So we visited the most important sites.

The Hypostyle hall is 54,000 sq feet and has 134 columns and is most definitely the largest hall any religious place has in the world. Apart from columns there is a beautiful lake which is now artificially filled with water. There were gardens and aviary surrounding it. The festival of Opet used to commence here and the procession ended at Luxor temple, 2.4 kms away.

The Hypostyle hall
Karnack temple.
Karnack temple.
Natural lake in the Karnack temple.
Karnack temple.

From here we moved to our last stop in Luxor, the Luxor Temple. During the early days Thebes, the city of hundred gates stood where the modern town of Luxor is now. It was the capital of Egypt. The Temple of Luxor is built on the banks of river Nile by Amenhotep and completed by Tutankhamen. Later Ramses II also added some structures. The granite shrine near the end of the temple is dedicated to Alexander the Great (332-305BC).

From Luxor temple we returned to the Airport for our flight back to Cairo.

Unknown figure from Roman times in Luxor temple.
Luxor temple.
Luxor temple.
Ramesses’ court in the Luxor temple.
Under this beautiful mosque is a church in the Luxor temple.
Luxor temple.

 

rdmathur

rdmathur

Retired banker high on life, who loves to travel and share his travel tales. Follow me on Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/tejiraj/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/RajeshwarMathur

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