Why Melbourne loves their parks?

Melbourne is not only a city of art and culture but of parks too and all of them are beautifully maintained.

Not only the locals but the World is now taking cognizance this fact as two of Melbourne’s parks, Royal Park and Fitzroy Park were awarded the prestigious Green Flag Award placing them among the world’s best parks.

The Scarred tree.
The scar on this tree was created when Aboriginal people removed bark to make canoes, shields, food and water containers, string, baby carriers and other items. Please respect this site. It is important to the Wurundjeri people as traditional custodians of the land and is part of the heritage of all Australians. All Aboriginal cultural sites are protected by law.

The Green Flag Award is managed by the Keep England Tidy organization, which judges the parks over eight criteria like “horticultural standards, cleanliness, sustainability, community involvement and providing a warm welcome”.

The Fitzroy Park in east Melbourne is spread over 26 hectares and boasts of city’s largest water harvesting facility. It is also one of the major Victorian era landscaped gardens in Australia.

Cook’s Cottage.
Model Tudor Village.

Among the various attractions inside the park are an ornamental lake, a scarred tree, Cook’s cottage (James Cook’s parents lived here), model Tudor village and a fairies’ tree. The park is also home to wild life like possums, ducks and small insect eating bats.

The Royal Park is spread over 170 hectares with a diverse landscape including wetlands and grasslands. It is next to Melbourne Zoo and houses a Golf Course and a huge Tennis Club.

The grassland between the Royal Children’s hospital and the Native Garden is used by kids to fly kites during the summer months. It was also used during the World War for troop housing.

This park is home to possums and a number of birds, like Black duck, white faced heron and collared sparrow hawk among others.

If you are in Melbourne do not miss these parks.

 

 

 

 

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A scarred tree in the gardens has been preserved. The plaque at the bottom of the tree reads:

The scar on this tree was created when Aboriginal people removed bark to make canoes, shields, food and water containers, string, baby carriers and other items.

Please respect this site. It is important to the Wurundjeri people as traditional custodians of the land and is part of the heritage of all Australians.

All Aboriginal cultural sites are protected by law.

rdmathur

rdmathur

Retired banker high on life, who loves to travel and share his travel tales.
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